Ecotourism In Costa Rica: Where to Go and Things to Do

Photo by Aleksandar Popovski on Unsplash

With its incredible biodiversity and a commitment to protecting its natural resources, Costa Rica has become one of the world’s premier destinations for ecotourism, a sustainable, responsible form of travel that emphasizes environmental conservation, cultural appreciation, and support for local communities. In this article, we will delve into the rich history of ecotourism in Costa Rica, explore its top destinations and must-experience activities, and learn how travelers can make a positive impact during their visit.

Costa Rica’s Commitment to Sustainable Tourism

Pioneering Ecotourism in Costa Rica

Costa Rica’s emergence as an ecotourism powerhouse can be traced back to the 1960s when the country’s government began to recognize the importance of preserving its diverse ecosystems. Over the years, the government has established national parks, wildlife refuges, and biological reserves, protecting nearly 25% of its land area. The country’s focus on sustainable tourism has not only helped preserve its natural wonders but has also allowed its economy to flourish, with tourism being one of the major contributors to its GDP.

In addition to its extensive protected areas, Costa Rica has also implemented a range of sustainable practices and initiatives that have bolstered its reputation as an ecotourism leader. These efforts have been integral to attracting environmentally conscious travelers who wish to enjoy the country’s stunning landscapes while minimizing their negative impact on the environment and local communities.

Certifications and Initiatives

The Certification for Sustainable Tourism (CST) is a voluntary program developed by the Costa Rican Tourism Board to evaluate and recognize sustainable tourism businesses. The CST assesses various aspects of a company’s operations, such as waste management, energy conservation, and community engagement, and rates them on a scale of one to five leaves. Businesses with higher leaf ratings are considered more sustainable and environmentally friendly.

Another noteworthy initiative is the Blue Flag Ecological Program, which promotes sustainable development in coastal areas, including beaches and marinas. The program awards Blue Flags to communities that meet strict environmental, safety, and accessibility criteria, ensuring that these locations are ideal for ecotourists seeking pristine, well-maintained environments.

Top Ecotourism in Costa Rica Destinations

There are an impressive array of destinations for ecotourism in Costa Rica, catering to a wide range of interests and preferences. From lush rainforests teeming with wildlife to tranquil beaches where sea turtles nest, the country offers countless opportunities for nature lovers and adventure seekers alike.

National Parks in Costa Rica

Corcovado National Park

ecotourism in costa rica
Photo by Richard Goggin on Unsplash

Located on the remote Osa Peninsula, Corcovado National Park is often considered the crown jewel of Costa Rica’s park system. This biodiverse paradise is home to countless plant and animal species, including jaguars, tapirs, and scarlet macaws. Visitors can explore the park’s vast trail network, which winds through various ecosystems, such as primary rainforests, mangroves, and coastal habitats.

Tortuguero National Park

Situated on the Caribbean coast, Tortuguero National Park is a haven for sea turtles, as its beaches serve as nesting grounds for endangered green, leatherback, and hawksbill turtles. The park’s extensive network of waterways and canals also supports a diverse array of wildlife, including monkeys, caimans, and over 300 bird species. Travelers can explore the park via guided boat tours, which offer a unique perspective on this vibrant ecosystem.

Wildlife Refuges

Gandoca-Manzanillo Wildlife Refuge

Gandoca-Manzanillo Wildlife Refuge, located on the southern Caribbean coast, protects a diverse range of habitats, from pristine beaches to dense rainforests. The refuge is particularly

noted for its nesting sea turtles, as well as its vibrant coral reefs, which are home to an array of colorful marine life. Visitors can explore the refuge’s beautiful hiking trails or embark on guided snorkeling excursions to observe the underwater wonders.

Ostional Wildlife Refuge

Ostional Wildlife Refuge on the Pacific coast is renowned for its arribadas, or mass nesting events, during which thousands of olive ridley sea turtles come ashore to lay their eggs. These remarkable events typically occur between July and December, and visitors can witness this spectacle on guided nighttime tours led by local experts.

Biological Reserves

Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve

Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve, nestled high in the Tilarán Mountains, is an enchanting destination known for its unique cloud forest ecosystem. This mist-shrouded paradise is home to over 400 bird species, including the elusive resplendent quetzal, and offers an extensive network of trails for visitors to explore. The reserve also features canopy walkways and suspension bridges, providing a bird’s-eye view of the forest’s diverse flora and fauna.

Cabo Blanco Absolute Natural Reserve

Cabo Blanco Absolute Natural Reserve, situated on the southern tip of the Nicoya Peninsula, is the country’s first protected area and a testament to Costa Rica’s commitment to conservation. This pristine reserve features a variety of habitats, from lush forests to rugged coastlines, and is home to a diverse array of wildlife, such as white-faced capuchin monkeys, coatis, and countless bird species. Visitors can enjoy hiking the reserve’s well-maintained trails, which offer stunning vistas and ample wildlife-spotting opportunities.

Must-Experience Ecotours

Ecotourism in Costa Rica is not limited to passive observation of nature; the country offers numerous immersive and exhilarating experiences that allow visitors to explore its diverse ecosystems up close and personal.

Rainforest Tours

Arenal Hanging Bridges

The Arenal Hanging Bridges offer a unique perspective on the rainforest canopy, as visitors traverse a series of suspension bridges and walking trails through the lush vegetation. This thrilling experience provides ample opportunities to spot wildlife, such as sloths, monkeys, and a variety of colorful birds, while enjoying panoramic views of the iconic Arenal Volcano.

La Fortuna Waterfall

ecotourism in costa rica
Photo by Etienne Delorieux on Unsplash

The La Fortuna Waterfall, located near Arenal Volcano, is a stunning 230-foot cascade that plunges into a crystal-clear pool, perfect for a refreshing swim. A hike through the verdant rainforest leads visitors to this spectacular natural wonder, where they can enjoy a serene and picturesque setting amidst the surrounding flora and fauna.

Marine Life and Coral Reefs

Cano Island

Cano Island, situated off the Pacific coast, is a premier snorkeling and diving destination, renowned for its vibrant coral reefs and abundant marine life. Visitors can embark on guided tours to explore the island’s underwater treasures, including sea turtles, dolphins, manta rays, and even the occasional whale shark.

Cahuita National Park

Cahuita National Park, located on the Caribbean coast, features a stunning coral reef that is home to a wide variety of marine species, such as colorful fish, sea turtles, and nurse sharks. Guided snorkeling and diving excursions offer visitors a chance to explore this underwater paradise while learning about the park’s unique ecosystems and conservation efforts.

Birdwatching

Quetzales National Park

Quetzales National Park, situated in the Talamanca Mountains, is a prime destination for birdwatching enthusiasts, as it is home to the elusive resplendent quetzal, along with over 200 other bird species. Guided tours led by expert birdwatchers provide visitors with the opportunity to spot these magnificent creatures in their

natural habitat, while also learning about the park’s unique ecosystems and conservation efforts.

Palo Verde National Park

Palo Verde National Park, located in the Guanacaste province, is a haven for birdwatchers, boasting over 300 bird species, including herons, egrets, and jabiru storks. The park’s diverse wetland habitats attract migratory birds and provide ample opportunities for visitors to observe these feathered residents on guided tours or while navigating the park’s network of trails.

Adventure Tours

Rappelling and Zip-lining

ecotourism in costa rica
Photo by Perry Grone on Unsplash

Costa Rica’s lush rainforests and dramatic landscapes provide the perfect backdrop for adrenaline-pumping adventure tours. Rappelling and zip-lining are popular activities that allow visitors to experience the country’s stunning scenery from unique vantage points while also enjoying a thrilling, immersive experience. Several reputable companies offer guided tours in various locations, ensuring a safe and unforgettable adventure.

Whitewater Rafting

Whitewater rafting is another exhilarating activity that allows visitors to explore Costa Rica’s pristine rivers and vibrant ecosystems. With a range of difficulty levels available, from gentle Class I rapids to challenging Class IV rapids, there is an option suitable for all ages and skill levels. Guided tours led by experienced rafting guides ensure a safe and exciting journey through the country’s breathtaking landscapes.

Supporting Local Communities

Ecotourism in Costa Rica is not only about preserving the environment but also about uplifting local communities and promoting cultural exchange. Several initiatives and destinations allow visitors to engage with local people, learn about their traditions, and contribute to their well-being.

Community-based Ecotourism in Costa Rica

Bribri Indigenous Reserve

The Bribri Indigenous Reserve, located in the Talamanca region, offers a unique opportunity for visitors to learn about the rich culture and traditions of the Bribri people. Guided tours led by community members provide insight into the tribe’s customs, history, and traditional way of life, while also supporting their sustainable livelihoods.

Caminos de Osa

Caminos de Osa is a community-based ecotourism initiative in the Osa Peninsula that seeks to empower local communities while promoting sustainable tourism. The project offers a range of immersive experiences, such as homestays, guided hikes, and wildlife observation, allowing visitors to connect with the region’s natural beauty and support local development initiatives.

Volunteering Opportunities

Wildlife Conservation Projects

For those looking to make a more substantial impact during their visit, various wildlife conservation projects in Costa Rica offer volunteer opportunities. These initiatives often focus on endangered species, such as sea turtles, and provide hands-on experience in monitoring, data collection, and habitat restoration.

Reforestation Initiatives

Reforestation efforts in Costa Rica aim to combat deforestation and restore the country’s precious ecosystems. Several organizations offer volunteer opportunities for travelers to participate in tree planting activities, helping to ensure the long-term health and sustainability of the country’s forests.

Tips for the Responsible Ecotourist

ecotourism in costa rica
Photo by Filip Mroz on Unsplash

Being a responsible ecotourist in Costa Rica involves respecting local culture, reducing one’s environmental impact, and supporting local businesses. By following these guidelines, visitors can ensure that their travel experiences contribute positively to the environment, the local economy, and the communities they visit.

Here are some practical tips for responsible ecotourism in Costa Rica:

  1. Respecting local culture: Make an effort to learn about Costa Rican customs, traditions, and etiquette. Dress modestly, especially when visiting indigenous reserves or rural communities. Always ask for permission before taking photos of people or their property.
  2. Reducing environmental impact: Practice the “leave no trace” principles by disposing of waste properly, staying on designated trails, and avoiding the collection of natural souvenirs such as shells or plants. Conserve water and energy in your accommodation by taking short showers and turning off lights and appliances when not in use.
  3. Supporting local businesses: Choose locally-owned accommodations, restaurants, and tour operators whenever possible. This helps keep the money you spend in the local economy and contributes to the well-being of the communities you visit. Additionally, purchase handmade souvenirs from local artisans rather than mass-produced items.
  4. Protecting wildlife: Keep a respectful distance from wild animals and never feed them, as this can disrupt their natural behavior and diet. If participating in a wildlife tour, choose operators that prioritize the well-being of the animals and adhere to responsible wildlife viewing guidelines.
  5. Educating yourself: Learn about the environmental and social issues facing the places you visit. This knowledge will help you make informed decisions about the activities you engage in and the organizations you support during your trip.

Conclusion

Costa Rica is a shining example of how ecotourism can contribute to the preservation of the environment and the well-being of local communities. By exploring the country’s diverse ecosystems, engaging with its people, and supporting sustainable initiatives, visitors can enjoy a truly transformative experience while making a positive impact. Whether you’re an adventure seeker, a nature enthusiast, or a responsible traveler, ecotourism in Costa Rica offers something for everyone, and it will surely leave you with unforgettable memories and a deep appreciation for the natural world.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  1. What is the best time of year to visit Costa Rica for ecotourism? Costa Rica’s weather varies throughout the year, but generally, the dry season (December to April) is the best time to visit for outdoor activities and wildlife viewing. However, the green season (May to November) offers lower prices, fewer crowds, and a lush, verdant landscape, making it an attractive option for some travelers.
  2. Is ecotourism in Costa Rica suitable for families? Yes, ecotourism in Costa Rica is typically suitable for families with children. Many national parks and reserves have well-maintained trails and visitor centers with educational exhibits, while adventure tours, such as zip-lining and rafting, often cater to different age groups and skill levels.
  3. What are the accommodation options for ecotourists in Costa Rica? Costa Rica has a variety of eco-friendly accommodations, ranging from budget-friendly ecolodges to luxurious eco-resorts. Many of these properties hold a Certification for Sustainable Tourism (CST) rating, which ensures that they adhere to high standards of environmental responsibility and social commitment.
  4. How can I ensure that I choose a truly sustainable ecotourism provider? Look for businesses with a CST rating or other recognized sustainability certifications, and research their environmental policies and practices. Read reviews from previous customers and consider recommendations from trusted sources, such as guidebooks or travel forums.
  5. What are some essential packing tips for ecotourism in Costa Rica? Bring lightweight, quick-drying clothing, a reusable water bottle, and a waterproof bag for electronics. Opt for biodegradable toiletries and sunblock to minimize your environmental impact. Don’t forget a hat and sunglasses.

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Ecotourism In Costa Rica: Where to Go and Things to Do

Photo by Aleksandar Popovski on Unsplash

With its incredible biodiversity and a commitment to protecting its natural resources, Costa Rica has become one of the world’s premier destinations for ecotourism, a sustainable, responsible form of travel that emphasizes environmental conservation, cultural appreciation, and support for local communities. In this article, we will delve into the rich history of ecotourism in Costa Rica, explore its top destinations and must-experience activities, and learn how travelers can make a positive impact during their visit.

Costa Rica’s Commitment to Sustainable Tourism

Pioneering Ecotourism in Costa Rica

Costa Rica’s emergence as an ecotourism powerhouse can be traced back to the 1960s when the country’s government began to recognize the importance of preserving its diverse ecosystems. Over the years, the government has established national parks, wildlife refuges, and biological reserves, protecting nearly 25% of its land area. The country’s focus on sustainable tourism has not only helped preserve its natural wonders but has also allowed its economy to flourish, with tourism being one of the major contributors to its GDP.

In addition to its extensive protected areas, Costa Rica has also implemented a range of sustainable practices and initiatives that have bolstered its reputation as an ecotourism leader. These efforts have been integral to attracting environmentally conscious travelers who wish to enjoy the country’s stunning landscapes while minimizing their negative impact on the environment and local communities.

Certifications and Initiatives

The Certification for Sustainable Tourism (CST) is a voluntary program developed by the Costa Rican Tourism Board to evaluate and recognize sustainable tourism businesses. The CST assesses various aspects of a company’s operations, such as waste management, energy conservation, and community engagement, and rates them on a scale of one to five leaves. Businesses with higher leaf ratings are considered more sustainable and environmentally friendly.

Another noteworthy initiative is the Blue Flag Ecological Program, which promotes sustainable development in coastal areas, including beaches and marinas. The program awards Blue Flags to communities that meet strict environmental, safety, and accessibility criteria, ensuring that these locations are ideal for ecotourists seeking pristine, well-maintained environments.

Top Ecotourism in Costa Rica Destinations

There are an impressive array of destinations for ecotourism in Costa Rica, catering to a wide range of interests and preferences. From lush rainforests teeming with wildlife to tranquil beaches where sea turtles nest, the country offers countless opportunities for nature lovers and adventure seekers alike.

National Parks in Costa Rica

Corcovado National Park

ecotourism in costa rica
Photo by Richard Goggin on Unsplash

Located on the remote Osa Peninsula, Corcovado National Park is often considered the crown jewel of Costa Rica’s park system. This biodiverse paradise is home to countless plant and animal species, including jaguars, tapirs, and scarlet macaws. Visitors can explore the park’s vast trail network, which winds through various ecosystems, such as primary rainforests, mangroves, and coastal habitats.

Tortuguero National Park

Situated on the Caribbean coast, Tortuguero National Park is a haven for sea turtles, as its beaches serve as nesting grounds for endangered green, leatherback, and hawksbill turtles. The park’s extensive network of waterways and canals also supports a diverse array of wildlife, including monkeys, caimans, and over 300 bird species. Travelers can explore the park via guided boat tours, which offer a unique perspective on this vibrant ecosystem.

Wildlife Refuges

Gandoca-Manzanillo Wildlife Refuge

Gandoca-Manzanillo Wildlife Refuge, located on the southern Caribbean coast, protects a diverse range of habitats, from pristine beaches to dense rainforests. The refuge is particularly

noted for its nesting sea turtles, as well as its vibrant coral reefs, which are home to an array of colorful marine life. Visitors can explore the refuge’s beautiful hiking trails or embark on guided snorkeling excursions to observe the underwater wonders.

Ostional Wildlife Refuge

Ostional Wildlife Refuge on the Pacific coast is renowned for its arribadas, or mass nesting events, during which thousands of olive ridley sea turtles come ashore to lay their eggs. These remarkable events typically occur between July and December, and visitors can witness this spectacle on guided nighttime tours led by local experts.

Biological Reserves

Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve

Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve, nestled high in the Tilarán Mountains, is an enchanting destination known for its unique cloud forest ecosystem. This mist-shrouded paradise is home to over 400 bird species, including the elusive resplendent quetzal, and offers an extensive network of trails for visitors to explore. The reserve also features canopy walkways and suspension bridges, providing a bird’s-eye view of the forest’s diverse flora and fauna.

Cabo Blanco Absolute Natural Reserve

Cabo Blanco Absolute Natural Reserve, situated on the southern tip of the Nicoya Peninsula, is the country’s first protected area and a testament to Costa Rica’s commitment to conservation. This pristine reserve features a variety of habitats, from lush forests to rugged coastlines, and is home to a diverse array of wildlife, such as white-faced capuchin monkeys, coatis, and countless bird species. Visitors can enjoy hiking the reserve’s well-maintained trails, which offer stunning vistas and ample wildlife-spotting opportunities.

Must-Experience Ecotours

Ecotourism in Costa Rica is not limited to passive observation of nature; the country offers numerous immersive and exhilarating experiences that allow visitors to explore its diverse ecosystems up close and personal.

Rainforest Tours

Arenal Hanging Bridges

The Arenal Hanging Bridges offer a unique perspective on the rainforest canopy, as visitors traverse a series of suspension bridges and walking trails through the lush vegetation. This thrilling experience provides ample opportunities to spot wildlife, such as sloths, monkeys, and a variety of colorful birds, while enjoying panoramic views of the iconic Arenal Volcano.

La Fortuna Waterfall

ecotourism in costa rica
Photo by Etienne Delorieux on Unsplash

The La Fortuna Waterfall, located near Arenal Volcano, is a stunning 230-foot cascade that plunges into a crystal-clear pool, perfect for a refreshing swim. A hike through the verdant rainforest leads visitors to this spectacular natural wonder, where they can enjoy a serene and picturesque setting amidst the surrounding flora and fauna.

Marine Life and Coral Reefs

Cano Island

Cano Island, situated off the Pacific coast, is a premier snorkeling and diving destination, renowned for its vibrant coral reefs and abundant marine life. Visitors can embark on guided tours to explore the island’s underwater treasures, including sea turtles, dolphins, manta rays, and even the occasional whale shark.

Cahuita National Park

Cahuita National Park, located on the Caribbean coast, features a stunning coral reef that is home to a wide variety of marine species, such as colorful fish, sea turtles, and nurse sharks. Guided snorkeling and diving excursions offer visitors a chance to explore this underwater paradise while learning about the park’s unique ecosystems and conservation efforts.

Birdwatching

Quetzales National Park

Quetzales National Park, situated in the Talamanca Mountains, is a prime destination for birdwatching enthusiasts, as it is home to the elusive resplendent quetzal, along with over 200 other bird species. Guided tours led by expert birdwatchers provide visitors with the opportunity to spot these magnificent creatures in their

natural habitat, while also learning about the park’s unique ecosystems and conservation efforts.

Palo Verde National Park

Palo Verde National Park, located in the Guanacaste province, is a haven for birdwatchers, boasting over 300 bird species, including herons, egrets, and jabiru storks. The park’s diverse wetland habitats attract migratory birds and provide ample opportunities for visitors to observe these feathered residents on guided tours or while navigating the park’s network of trails.

Adventure Tours

Rappelling and Zip-lining

ecotourism in costa rica
Photo by Perry Grone on Unsplash

Costa Rica’s lush rainforests and dramatic landscapes provide the perfect backdrop for adrenaline-pumping adventure tours. Rappelling and zip-lining are popular activities that allow visitors to experience the country’s stunning scenery from unique vantage points while also enjoying a thrilling, immersive experience. Several reputable companies offer guided tours in various locations, ensuring a safe and unforgettable adventure.

Whitewater Rafting

Whitewater rafting is another exhilarating activity that allows visitors to explore Costa Rica’s pristine rivers and vibrant ecosystems. With a range of difficulty levels available, from gentle Class I rapids to challenging Class IV rapids, there is an option suitable for all ages and skill levels. Guided tours led by experienced rafting guides ensure a safe and exciting journey through the country’s breathtaking landscapes.

Supporting Local Communities

Ecotourism in Costa Rica is not only about preserving the environment but also about uplifting local communities and promoting cultural exchange. Several initiatives and destinations allow visitors to engage with local people, learn about their traditions, and contribute to their well-being.

Community-based Ecotourism in Costa Rica

Bribri Indigenous Reserve

The Bribri Indigenous Reserve, located in the Talamanca region, offers a unique opportunity for visitors to learn about the rich culture and traditions of the Bribri people. Guided tours led by community members provide insight into the tribe’s customs, history, and traditional way of life, while also supporting their sustainable livelihoods.

Caminos de Osa

Caminos de Osa is a community-based ecotourism initiative in the Osa Peninsula that seeks to empower local communities while promoting sustainable tourism. The project offers a range of immersive experiences, such as homestays, guided hikes, and wildlife observation, allowing visitors to connect with the region’s natural beauty and support local development initiatives.

Volunteering Opportunities

Wildlife Conservation Projects

For those looking to make a more substantial impact during their visit, various wildlife conservation projects in Costa Rica offer volunteer opportunities. These initiatives often focus on endangered species, such as sea turtles, and provide hands-on experience in monitoring, data collection, and habitat restoration.

Reforestation Initiatives

Reforestation efforts in Costa Rica aim to combat deforestation and restore the country’s precious ecosystems. Several organizations offer volunteer opportunities for travelers to participate in tree planting activities, helping to ensure the long-term health and sustainability of the country’s forests.

Tips for the Responsible Ecotourist

ecotourism in costa rica
Photo by Filip Mroz on Unsplash

Being a responsible ecotourist in Costa Rica involves respecting local culture, reducing one’s environmental impact, and supporting local businesses. By following these guidelines, visitors can ensure that their travel experiences contribute positively to the environment, the local economy, and the communities they visit.

Here are some practical tips for responsible ecotourism in Costa Rica:

  1. Respecting local culture: Make an effort to learn about Costa Rican customs, traditions, and etiquette. Dress modestly, especially when visiting indigenous reserves or rural communities. Always ask for permission before taking photos of people or their property.
  2. Reducing environmental impact: Practice the “leave no trace” principles by disposing of waste properly, staying on designated trails, and avoiding the collection of natural souvenirs such as shells or plants. Conserve water and energy in your accommodation by taking short showers and turning off lights and appliances when not in use.
  3. Supporting local businesses: Choose locally-owned accommodations, restaurants, and tour operators whenever possible. This helps keep the money you spend in the local economy and contributes to the well-being of the communities you visit. Additionally, purchase handmade souvenirs from local artisans rather than mass-produced items.
  4. Protecting wildlife: Keep a respectful distance from wild animals and never feed them, as this can disrupt their natural behavior and diet. If participating in a wildlife tour, choose operators that prioritize the well-being of the animals and adhere to responsible wildlife viewing guidelines.
  5. Educating yourself: Learn about the environmental and social issues facing the places you visit. This knowledge will help you make informed decisions about the activities you engage in and the organizations you support during your trip.

Conclusion

Costa Rica is a shining example of how ecotourism can contribute to the preservation of the environment and the well-being of local communities. By exploring the country’s diverse ecosystems, engaging with its people, and supporting sustainable initiatives, visitors can enjoy a truly transformative experience while making a positive impact. Whether you’re an adventure seeker, a nature enthusiast, or a responsible traveler, ecotourism in Costa Rica offers something for everyone, and it will surely leave you with unforgettable memories and a deep appreciation for the natural world.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  1. What is the best time of year to visit Costa Rica for ecotourism? Costa Rica’s weather varies throughout the year, but generally, the dry season (December to April) is the best time to visit for outdoor activities and wildlife viewing. However, the green season (May to November) offers lower prices, fewer crowds, and a lush, verdant landscape, making it an attractive option for some travelers.
  2. Is ecotourism in Costa Rica suitable for families? Yes, ecotourism in Costa Rica is typically suitable for families with children. Many national parks and reserves have well-maintained trails and visitor centers with educational exhibits, while adventure tours, such as zip-lining and rafting, often cater to different age groups and skill levels.
  3. What are the accommodation options for ecotourists in Costa Rica? Costa Rica has a variety of eco-friendly accommodations, ranging from budget-friendly ecolodges to luxurious eco-resorts. Many of these properties hold a Certification for Sustainable Tourism (CST) rating, which ensures that they adhere to high standards of environmental responsibility and social commitment.
  4. How can I ensure that I choose a truly sustainable ecotourism provider? Look for businesses with a CST rating or other recognized sustainability certifications, and research their environmental policies and practices. Read reviews from previous customers and consider recommendations from trusted sources, such as guidebooks or travel forums.
  5. What are some essential packing tips for ecotourism in Costa Rica? Bring lightweight, quick-drying clothing, a reusable water bottle, and a waterproof bag for electronics. Opt for biodegradable toiletries and sunblock to minimize your environmental impact. Don’t forget a hat and sunglasses.

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